Capra, Keaton and Hitchcock Films Among 2016 National Film Registry Inductees

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden announced today the annual selection of 25 motion pictures that have been inducted into the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress because of their cultural, historic or aesthetic importance. (LOC) The 2016 inductees represent several genres and span the period from 1903 to 1998. The interesting variety offered this year includes several classic notables you’ll no doubt recognize. I’m excited about quite a few of this year’s choices, which brings the total number of films on the National Registry to 700. Needless to say, this is cause for a gallery.
Here are the 2016 National Film Registry inductees:

1. Atomic Cafe, The (1982)

atomic

2. Ball of Fire (1941)

ball-of-fire

3. Beau Brummels, The (1928)

beau-brummels

4. Birds, The (1963)

birds

5. Blackboard Jungle (1955)

blackboard

6. Breakfast Club, The (1985)

bc

7. Decline of Western Civilization, The (1981)

western

8. East of Eden (1955)

east

9. Funny Girl (1968)

funny-girl

10. Life of an American Fireman (1903)

fireman

11. Lion King, The (1994)

lion-king

12. Lost Horizon (1937)

lost-horizon

13. Musketeers of Pig Alley, The (1912)

pig-alley

14. Paris Is Burning (1990)

paris

15. Point Blank (1967)

point

16. Princess Bride, The (1987)

princess-bride

17. Putney Swope (1969)

putney-swope

18. Rushmore (1998)

rushmore

19. Solomon Sir Jones films (1924-28)

(A collection of home movies, produced by Baptist minister and businessman Solomon Sir Jones. The films showcase a rich tapestry of African-American communities in Oklahoma from 1924 to 1928. (LOC)
solomon

20. Steamboat Bill, Jr. (1928)

steamboat-bill

21. Suzanne, Suzanne (1982)

suzanne

22. Thelma & Louise (1991)

thelma-louise

23. 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (1916)

20000

24. Walk in the Sun, A (1945)

walk

25. Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988)

rober-rabbit

3 thoughts

  1. Wow, a fascinating list. The big surprise for me is seeing “The Decline of Western Civilization” (part 1), which is very much a document of my own wayward youth. The only one I saw the year it came out was “Paris is Burning,” however. As far as my blog goes, it’s great that “20,000 Leagues” got in the same year that I reviewed it!

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