The Classic Movie History Project presents THE GOLDEN AGE

Day two of The Classic Movie History Project Blogathon has arrived.  I hope you have your thinking caps back on after yesterday’s silent lesson.

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Before the fun begins, a few thank yous – to Fritzi and Ruth, my co-hosts, wonderful bloggers and friends with whom I share this journey into the history of the movies.  To all participating bloggers – your passion and talent floor me.  And last, but certainly not least, to our sponsor Flicker Alley, which is supporting the event in honor of its release of Dziga Vertov: The Man with the Movie Camera and Other Newly-Restored Works and 3-D Rarities, which Ruth got a chance to review.

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Hosted by Fritzi at Movies, Silently the first day of the Classic Movie History Project Blogathon featured movies and players that broke ground, set the stage and exhibited eye-popping talent in realms no one could have ever imagined.  Tomorrow Ruth of Silver Screenings will host the modern era during which rebels and epics filled wider screens.  Today the golden age takes center stage, the period in the movies that brought forth an astounding convergence of talent, skill and experience that met the demands of record-breaking theater attendance. Not all was “golden” in the golden era, however.  As you will see by the blogathon entries there was plenty of angst and bitterness portrayed on-screen during this time in movie history to counteract the exuberance of the grand musicals.  In short, whatever your movie poison might be you could get in the theaters of the golden age when dreams were streamlined by a well-oiled machine.

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If you missed yesterday’s entries, which is where you should start this lesson, visit The Silent Era.

Then move on to…

The Golden Age

(1930-1952)

I will be updating links to the submissions as they come in so be sure to check back often.

1930-1931: All Singing! All Dancing! All Talking! The end of the sound transition.

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A person in the Dark – Early Musicals: Throw it on the wall and see what sticks

Classic Reel Girl – Pre-Code Portrayals of Taxi Dancers

Cinephilia – Lubitsch Films (1930-1943)

Silver Screen Modes – When Fashion Sold the Movies: 1930-1940

1932-1934: Is that a gun in your pocket or are you just happy to see me? The wild world of pre-Code.

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Carole & Co. – Of Carole and Pre-Code

Second Sight Cinema – Newsreels of the Early 1930s: The Two-Way Mirror Between Fact and Fiction

Outspoken & Freckled – Women in Film 1932-1934

CineMaven’s Essays from the Couch – Heat Lightning

Stars and Letters – Joseph Breen and the Production Code

Girls Do Film – Pre-Code Morals – Barbara Stanwyck’s Bad Girls

The Stop Button – Son of Kong

Wolffian Classic Movies Digest – Bette Davis, dame of the screen

In the Good Old Days of Classic Hollywood – Ethel Barrymore’s transition from stage to screen

Stevielounicks – Dinner at Eight

1935-1938: Let’s misbeha— I mean, lovely day, isn’t it? The Code enforced and the rise of Technicolor.

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Nitrate Glow – Feature Films of Disney’s Golden Age

CineMaven’s Essays from the Couch (Guest post by Fernando) – The Flame Within

Silver Scenes – 1936: A Grand Year in Film

1939: The Big Year. Selections from the biggest year in classic cinema.

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Movie Movie Blog Blog – The Story behind Laurel and Hardy’s The Flying Deuces (1939)

Smitten Kitten Vintage – 1939: A Year in Film Part 1, A Year in Film Part 2, A Year in Film Part 3

Movie Fan Fare – The worst of 1939

1940-1945: We’ll murdelize that paper hanger! Wartime cinema

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The Vintage Cameo – Classic Movie History: Wartime Musicals

Speakeasy – RKO in 1943

The Motion Pictures – For Me and My Gal as Wartime Cinema

Way too damn lazy to write a blog – Christmas in Connecticut a.k.a. The Christmas Movie According to Babs

Shadows and Satin – Barbara Stanwyck and Film Noir

I Heart Ingrid – Hedy Lamarr: Smoking Hot Genius

Phyllis Loves Classic Movies – What the Stars Did to Help Win the War

1946-1949: Homecoming

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Queerly Different – The Rise and Fall of the Biblical Epic Part 1

Pure Golden Classics – Gilda: The Ultimate Film Noir

regularpop – Three Faces of Lizabeth Scott: Queen of the Noirs

B Noir Detour – Wartime Cinema: Gentleman’s Agreement, Crossfire, A Double Life

1950-1952: Realism and the Method: New directions

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Sister Celluloid – Stage Fright: Hitchcock Goes Home

Old Hollywood Films – Beyond Sunset Boulevard: The Hollywood Noirs of the 1950s

Hitchcock’s World – One Small Step for Man…

Caftan Woman – Westerns Thrive in a New Decade

Criterion Blues – The Collapse of the Studio System Part 1

Criterion Blues – The Collapse of the Studio System Part 2

Criterion Blues – The Collapse of the Studio System Part 3

regularpop – No Way to Treat a Lady: Loretta Young

Visit Silver Screenings for the final phase of the project, The Modern Era (1953-1975)

Finally, if you’re interested in taking a look at the complete roster for the Classic Movie History Project go here.

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43 thoughts

  1. Hi Aurora-

    Thank you SO much for hosting! This is my first blogathon and I’m not sure how to navigate the ins and outs of postings. I hope communicating with you here is ok?! I just added uploaded my post “Lizabeth Scott: Queen of the Noirs.” It was previously on the Homecoming section roster…

    Now I’ve got to get started reading!!

    1. My pleasure!! I misunderstood and thought you replaced this with the other post, but I’ll add it immediately. THANKS!!

      And ABSOLUTELY! Reach out at any time!

  2. Thanks, Aurora! Some great company here! I look forward to reading the rest.

    Wasn’t there going to be a post on the De Havilland decision? I gave an overview in mine and was going to link to it when posted.

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