A Garbo gallery

In honor of Garbo…a gallery…

She was once voted by The Guinness Book of World Records as the most beautiful woman who ever lived.  Her face remains recognizable the world over although she stopped making pictures over seven decades ago.  She was Greta Garbo and this is a pictorial tribute to the one called, “The Face.” Here’s a Garbo gallery.

In movies:

“I don’t want to be a silly temptress. I cannot see any sense in getting dressed up and doing nothing but tempting men in pictures.”

Gösta Berlings saga (1924)

The Joyless Street (1925)

Torrent (1926 – first U.S. film)

garbo

Flesh and the Devil (1927)

A Woman of Affairs (1928)

Anna Christie (1930) (her first talking role)

Mata Hari (1931)

Grand Hotel (1932)

Queen Christina (1933)

The Painted Veil (1934)

Anna Karenina (1935)

Camille (1936)

Ninotchka (1939)

Two-Faced Woman (1941)  Her last film.

Garbo was nominated four times for an Academy Award and received an honorary one in 1954 for her “luminous and unforgettable screen performances”.  That’s clear from these stills.  Who else could do that – really!

Magazine covers:

In 1999, the American Film Institute ranked Garbo fifth on their list of greatest female stars of all time in its 100 Years…100 Stars listing.

Random portraits:

“Being a movie star, and this applies to all of them, means being looked at from every possible direction. You are never left at peace, you’re just fair game.”

Unforgettable images of a face rendered frozen in time.  One that could not be restricted to celluloid.

Garbo’s sets were closed to all visitors and sometimes even the director! When asked why, she said:

“During these scenes I allow only the cameraman and lighting man on the set. The director goes out for a coffee or a milkshake. When people are watching, I’m just a woman making faces for the camera. It destroys the illusion. If I am by myself, my face will do things I cannot do with it otherwise.”

Who can argue?  LET her face do what it will!  Magnificent!

To the allure, beauty, mystery and legend of Garbo.

11 thoughts

  1. I agree with the Guinness Book! She was for sure marvelous, yet a beauty made in a studio backlot, not a natural beauty like her fellow Swedish Ingrid Bergman. Nice tribute, I can’t pick a favorite photo!
    Kisses!

  2. Stunning, she knew just what to do with her face to look her best. Also, she had one of those faces that I find beautifully mesmerising (The Face indeed), I could stare at it forever. I love that picture of her laughing in Two-Faced Woman.

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